The group of Progress Tools helps to support adults with learning difficulties, along with their carers and service providers, to set personal goals and to gauge how they are progressing against those goals. It is a set of tools designed to put people at the centre of review and planning of more person centred care services. Government policy now foregrounds people’s stories and experiences in the future of care services, with the aim of not only going beyond normal ‘tick boxing’ evaluation, but including people who use services more widely in the planning and design of future care. These tools aim to take a long term view of how services impact on user’s life choices. Included in the Progress Tools are the three tools: 

 

  • My Goals — My Goals is an evaluation tool that asks users of services for adults with learning difficulties to think about and record their own goals for the future. My Goals is an interactive evaluation tool co-​designed by the Glasgow School of Art and health care professionals who work with adults with learning difficulties across the Highlands of Scotland.
  • Rate and Review — The Rate and Review tool allows a service provider to engage with adults with learning difficulties, to think about their own goals, and to then rate how they, the service user, feels they are in achieving them. Rate and Review is an interactive evaluation tool co-​designed by the Glasgow School of Art and health care professionals who work with adults with learning difficulties across the Highlands of Scotland.
  • You Said, We Did — The You Said We Did tool is a simply way for a service provider working with adults with learning difficulties, to communicate changes to their services based on user feedback and suggestions. The tool visually illustrates what suggestions and feedback for services have been made, and the way in which the service provider is responding. You Said We Did is an interactive evaluation tool co-​designed by the Glasgow School of Art and health care professionals who work with adults with learning difficulties across the Highlands of Scotland.